GM goes further down the dumper; NiHM battery supplier broke due to Chevron

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by DeserTBoB, Feb 28, 2008.

  1. DeserTBoB

    DeserTBoB Guest

    GM may soon be feeling some of Chrysler's pain over bankrupt
    suppliers. The CarConnection reports Cobasys, supplier of the NiMH
    batteries used in the light-hybrid Vue, Aura and Malibu and holder of
    "a key contract in the development of GM's much-anticipated plug-in
    hybrid, the Volt," is out of money. The battery maker lost more than
    $76m last year and expect to lose $82m this year. To make matters
    worse, the company's joint owners, ChevronTexaco and ECD, can't agree
    on the 2008 budget. So Cobays' operating budget is $92m short.
    Cobasys is now on GM's "distressed supplier list;" the General refuses
    to comment on the situation. In the meantime, GM has struck a deal to
    buy batteries for its two-mode hybrid trucks from a Panasonic - Toyota
    joint venture.

    Note how it's ChevronTexaco who's putting the kibosh on Cobasys by
    stalling their budgeting...another move by Big Oil to stop any move
    toward electric propulsion dead in its tracks. A Democratic
    administration will probably have the government take over funding of
    NiMH development, thus ruining this attempt by Big Oil to "defund"
    competition for their products into oblivion.

    To read more:

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/news-blog/cobasys-crisis-has-gm-buying-batteries-from-toyota/
     
    DeserTBoB, Feb 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. I bet GM is kicking itself in the ass because they sold Stan Ovshinsky's
    Ovonics patents to Chevron in the first place after they crushed all of the
    EV1s
     
    Daniel Who Wants to Know, Feb 29, 2008
    #2
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  3. Electric car in Winnipeg? Forget it...might as well start walkin'.
     
    William W Western, Feb 29, 2008
    #3
  4. DeserTBoB

    ChEvRoLeT Guest

    LMFAO !! Electric car in Manitoba HAHAHAHAH it would freeze HAHAHAH My soon
    to be brother in law lives there and says he has his car programmed to start
    every 45min or the thing will freeze solid!! No joke He said the one time
    his car didn't start and the weather dropped 46 below with wind chill and
    the battery froze, rad fluid froze and oil was like mud BUT wait.. if the
    car is electric.. just plug in hair dryer
     
    ChEvRoLeT, Feb 29, 2008
    #4
  5. DeserTBoB

    Jeff Guest

    The wind chill will cause the car to cool off faster, but it won't get
    any colder than if there is no wind chill.
    The radiator fluid should not freeze nor should the battery at those
    temperatures.
    Use synthetic.
    They make these neat things called "extension cords" that lets you bring
    a hair drier outside.

    They also build these neat things called "garages" that let you store
    cars in a warmer environment.

    jeff
     
    Jeff, Feb 29, 2008
    #5
  6. LMFAO !! Electric car in Manitoba HAHAHAHAH it would freeze HAHAHAH My
    And if you can get them to start, you drive down the street on
    square tires for about fifteen minutes. Kerklunk, kerklunk.......
     
    William W Western, Feb 29, 2008
    #6
  7. The wind chill will cause the car to cool off faster, but it won't get any
    A car sitting in about -34C with no wind will
    stand a better chance starting than one sitting in -34C with a windchill
    of -46. That -46 wind chill separates the wheat from the chaff. The boys
    from the men. Winnipeg hit -38C this winter, and that was with no wind thank
    goodness.
    With a water cooled engine we use block heaters.
    Also little interior car warmers that keep the interior warm and the windows
    clear. Some people even use a battery blanket as well. When we drove in the
    States years ago (60s) with three electric cords and plugs hanging out the
    front a gas jockey in southern Minnesota asked if it was an electric car. We
    also had these clear plastic panels you stuck to the inside of the glass, in
    essence making a "sealed unit" to fight frost buildup. Better
    defroster/heaters have rendered them obsolete and I haven't seen them in
    years. Driving a British car in Winnipeg winters back in the 50s and 60s was
    particularly adventurous. A "demister" was no match for a 1/8" coating of
    frost. "Okay, quit breathing so much, I can't see out the bloody
    windscreen".
    Whaaah? Parking a car in a garage, eh? But where
    would I then store all these 8 track carts, players, and other assorted
    treasures?
     
    William W Western, Feb 29, 2008
    #7
  8. DeserTBoB

    Steve B. Guest


    Windchill applys to the cooling effect on exposed human skin. A car
    sitting in -34 with no wind ends up at the same temperature as a car
    sitting in -34 with 100 mph winds. -34

    Steve B.
     
    Steve B., Feb 29, 2008
    #8
  9. DeserTBoB

    DeserTBoB Guest

    Didn't do too well in school, obviously, as your grammar and spelling
    tell. Most Chevrolet fans are usually of that caliber.
     
    DeserTBoB, Feb 29, 2008
    #9
  10. DeserTBoB

    DeserTBoB Guest

    Don't bother trying to explain it to him...he's too dense.
    Not if it's 50/50 ethylene or polypropylene glycol and water, it sure
    shouldn't. Of course, people like this moron probably never service
    their cooling systems on time, either.
    ....and synthetic ATF...nary a problem with cold weather performance
    there! But wait...it's an old Chevy...not worth putting synthetic
    into, as the worn out valve guides will just pump it out in no time.
    Everywhere I went in Canada, there were "plug-ins"...duplex outlets so
    you could plug your trusty block heater in for a nice, warm night.
    Starting would be as if on a balmy day, even with a Detroit diesel.
    People of his class don't have "garages."
     
    DeserTBoB, Feb 29, 2008
    #10
  11. DeserTBoB

    DeserTBoB Guest

    -34°C atmospheric is -34°C to any inanimate object immersed in it.
    The wind just makes it cool faster (more gas circulating faster over
    the cooled object = faster heat transfer), but it'll never get any
    colder than -34C. Basic thermodynamics, high school physics...in
    which I got an A+, of course, which stood me in good stead as an
    undergrad.
    I used a Kim Hot-Start up in Canuckia back in my days up around
    there, (a VERY common US make). It was 500W and kept an 8V71 Detroit
    toasty enough to start on the first go 'round even at -20°C, along
    with a 250W oil sump heater running 20W-20 MIL 5208 oil, then de
    rigeur for any Detroit Diesel. Of course, starting any diesel
    (assuming the fuel isn't gelled and the oil isn't too thick) is easier
    at such cold temperatures anyway due to the lack of absolute moisture.
    Having #1 ASTM fuel was a big help on 2 strokes, too, but that went
    away everywhere after the First OPEC Embargo, and the only way to
    "make" it after that was to cut #2 with some water white kerosene. The
    WORST climate in which to start any diesel was around 5°C and high
    humidity. The large amount of water vapor, coupled with the cool
    intake air, would quench the detonation every time.

    The Brits could never built deicers for aircraft, either. Ask anyone
    who was over there in WWII and watched Lancasters fall out of the sky
    due to wing rime, while the 17s and 24s just flew by unfazed.
    Well, that's your choice! The garage is for the car...the junk goes
    in the junk room...or the dumpster, your choice.
     
    DeserTBoB, Feb 29, 2008
    #11

  12. Hillary went down the dumper in a grand fashion, not GM
     
    trippin-2-8-track, Feb 29, 2008
    #12
  13. DeserTBoB

    Mike Marlow Guest

    Categorically untrue. Your car does not understand wind-chill. Wind-chill
    is a reference for people only.
     
    Mike Marlow, Feb 29, 2008
    #13
  14. DeserTBoB

    Jeff Guest

    How can wind make air at -34 C colder than -34 C? It will cool off the
    car faster, but it won't make it any cold than -34 C.
     
    Jeff, Feb 29, 2008
    #14
  15. DeserTBoB

    Jeff Guest

    And other animals exposed to the cold, like dogs and cats.
     
    Jeff, Feb 29, 2008
    #15
  16. DeserTBoB

    Mike Marlow Guest


    You well know how this works Jeff - the wind blows some of those electrons
    away, robbing the car of its full starting power.
     
    Mike Marlow, Feb 29, 2008
    #16
  17. DeserTBoB

    Mike Marlow Guest

    Well yeah - but they don't complain about it.
     
    Mike Marlow, Feb 29, 2008
    #17
  18. How can wind make air at -34 C colder than -34 C? It will cool off theOf course wind chill readings are always prefaced by
    "feels like". But at any rate what I said was:
    A car sitting in about -34C with no wind will
    stand a better chance starting than one sitting in -34C with a windchill
    of -46. Which says nothing about cold or colder, just what I observed this
    past winter out on my street. And what CAA wait times would likely confirm.
    I dunno. Come spend 30 days here next January or February and find out. As
    wind chill readings rise the time required to freeze exposed flesh drops. I
    work outside in all weather and can assure all that -46/-56 wind chill
    separates the men from the boys and you will need to warm up more frequently
    than at -34 and no wind. And I wouldn't want to "currently" depend on an
    electric car here.
     
    William W Western, Feb 29, 2008
    #18
  19. Hillary went down the dumper in a grand fashion, not GM
    Speaking of wind chill.
     
    William W Western, Feb 29, 2008
    #19
  20. DeserTBoB

    DeserTBoB Guest

    Oh yeah, they do! If I'd leave my Buster out in the cold morn air
    after taking his morning constitutional, he'd sure bang on the door to
    have me let him into the warm house!

    Sidebar: Dogs aren't affected by "wind chill" on the same magnitude
    as humans, as they do not sweat except through their tongues and feet.
    "Wind chill" is a psychometric phenomenon, similar to what happened
    when you measure atmospheric moisture with a psychrometer...the wick
    on the wet bulb thermometer shows a depressed temperature from the dry
    bulb due to evaporation of water. Same happens to people or any
    animal that sweats through the skin.

    It does NOT affect cars, except to cool them down to atmospheric
    temperature faster.
     
    DeserTBoB, Feb 29, 2008
    #20
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